Go-Withs

A lot of the sets of shakers in my collection are what the world of salt-and-pepper-set collectors, apparently, call “go-withs”–the ones I like to call binary opposites: the shakers depict two quite different objects that have some logical or linguistic collection to each other, like the common opposites of black and white or good andContinue reading “Go-Withs”

And Now for Something Incompletely Different

These set appears to offer yet another set of racial stereotypes–but not, this time, aboriginal ones:The pitch-black skins, the big round eyes, the thick lips, the overall roundish dehumanizing cuteness–these are, it seems, a version of the standard classical caricature of people of African descent.  Much like the one in this old advertisement:Or like the traditionalContinue reading “And Now for Something Incompletely Different”

A Different Pair of Binaries

The aboriginal salt-and-pepper sets I’ve been describing in my latest group of posts are all gender-based.  They all consist of of one male and one female–or to be more accurate in the light of their indulgence is stereotypes, one cliché-type brave and one cliché-type squaw–the poem on the female of the pair I looked at in myContinue reading “A Different Pair of Binaries”

More Wooden Verse

Here’s another set of aboriginal stereotypes, drawn on pieces of wood with some of their bark still attached, and described in some even more wooden verse.  The usual markers, by now readily recognizable, are present: the hooked noses, the war bonnet, the headband, the braids.  The wooden poems, not so readily readable from the photos,Continue reading “More Wooden Verse”

More Adult Indigenes

Unlike the sets of salt-and-pepper shakers I’ve been describing in my last five entries, this set does not appear to represent children, and is not particularly cute.  The binary opposites are preserved, as they almost always are in the salt-and-pepper world, and it’s still a male and female couple.   But  the male is aContinue reading “More Adult Indigenes”

Aboriginal Metallica

This set once more represents an aboriginal couple as adorable children, and with more or less the usual stereotype markers: both with chubby cheeks,  both with pigtails, both, this time, wearing headbands with a single feather, he in a loincloth, she in a fringed long-sleeved dress.  While the two figures are both the same  height, he isContinue reading “Aboriginal Metallica”

Cute Natives Yet Again

Are they children, or just sort of generically pudgy cuties?  One way or the other, this set confirms the prevalence of certain characteristics as markers of a stereotype.  They wear fringed leather-coloured garments.  They have round eyes and chubby cheeks.  The male has the usual war bonnet, the female the usual one feather sticking upContinue reading “Cute Natives Yet Again”

More Cute Aborginals

More of my population of youthfully chubby natives.  These guys come with their own teepee–which has a mysterious large hole and a Thunderbird painted below it.   Despite the somewhat mucky colours and unglossy surfaces, these two appear to be utopianly young and adorable, as she holds one of her braids with a come-hither lookContinue reading “More Cute Aborginals”

Cute Aboriginality

The set of shakers I talked about in my last post stands out from most of the other pairs I have that represent stereotypes of indigenous people in one key way: it depicts adults.  Most of the others are more like this set:  They seem to be representing children–cute chubby-and-rosy-cheeked children, even in spite of theContinue reading “Cute Aboriginality”