More Wooden Verse

Here’s another set of aboriginal stereotypes, drawn on pieces of wood with some of their bark still attached, and described in some even more wooden verse.  The usual markers, by now readily recognizable, are present: the hooked noses, the war bonnet, the headband, the braids.  The wooden poems, not so readily readable from the photos,Continue reading “More Wooden Verse”

Miniature Aboriginality

The racial and ethnic stereotype population of my salt-and-pepper collection consists primarily of shakers depicting the indigenous peoples of North America: I have nine pairs of them.  But of course, these shakers don’t really look anything like any actual former or current members of indigenous nations: what I have on my shelves can be moreContinue reading “Miniature Aboriginality”

Cuteness

I’ve often had people look at one or another of my salt-and-pepper sets and say, “Oh, that’s really cute.”  And indeed, it strikes me that almost all of the sets I have in my collection do fit easily in the category of “cute.”  The exude cuteness.  Which raises the question: what do we mean whenContinue reading “Cuteness”

The Ultimate Amputee?

At first glance, this set is merely a little mysterious: Could it be the profiles of two pregnancies?  Or a couple of faceless guys with bad toothaches?  Or perhaps just a couple of chawed-off hunks of bubble gum? Bringing the two shakers towards each other solves the mystery: It is, in fact, the ultimate amputee:Continue reading “The Ultimate Amputee?”