Two Seated Ladies

A seated woman sits down for a chat with another seated woman:The newcomer is a much more business-like looking woman.  She has a crisp white collar, and no flowers, no puppy, no gardening hat.  Is she, perhaps, a therapist of some sort, trying to assist our old friend with whatever horror it is that hasContinue reading “Two Seated Ladies”

Precious in Pink

First, this time, we have a woman sitting beside a woman sitting: Each of the two ladies has a pet, one cat and one dog; and each holds something in her two hands: the cat, and I think (although it’s depicted quite vaguely), a bouquet of flowers.  This new sitting lady is so exceedingly and delicatelyContinue reading “Precious in Pink”

One More Link in the Chain

Last time around, I looked at an old woman who was in a relationship with an old man.  The old man now goes with, of course, another old man: This one is sitting on a rocking chair, apparently asleep, and with an animal, probably a dog even though it has owl-like eyes, asleep on top ofContinue reading “One More Link in the Chain”

Once More for Old Times Sake

The chain of go-withs continues.  First an egg with a goose, then a goose with an old lady, and now, an old lady with . . what? One old lady–no, let us say one mature lady–goes, first of all, with another mature lady:And then, one mature lady clearly goes with a mature gentleman.  Well, ifContinue reading “Once More for Old Times Sake”

What’s Good for the Goose?

As was revealed in my last post , an egg, especially a golden one like this: goes with a goose: But then, what else does a goose go with?The answer of course, is an old woman–particularly, I suspect, the old woman known as Mother Goose:And so we have another interesting go-with, a goose and an old woman, twoContinue reading “What’s Good for the Goose?”

Go-Withs

A lot of the sets of shakers in my collection are what the world of salt-and-pepper-set collectors, apparently, call “go-withs”–the ones I like to call binary opposites: the shakers depict two quite different objects that have some logical or linguistic collection to each other, like the common opposites of black and white or good andContinue reading “Go-Withs”

And Now for Something Incompletely Different

These set appears to offer yet another set of racial stereotypes–but not, this time, aboriginal ones:The pitch-black skins, the big round eyes, the thick lips, the overall roundish dehumanizing cuteness–these are, it seems, a version of the standard classical caricature of people of African descent.  Much like the one in this old advertisement:Or like the traditionalContinue reading “And Now for Something Incompletely Different”

A Different Pair of Binaries

The aboriginal salt-and-pepper sets I’ve been describing in my latest group of posts are all gender-based.  They all consist of of one male and one female–or to be more accurate in the light of their indulgence is stereotypes, one cliché-type brave and one cliché-type squaw–the poem on the female of the pair I looked at in myContinue reading “A Different Pair of Binaries”

More Wooden Verse

Here’s another set of aboriginal stereotypes, drawn on pieces of wood with some of their bark still attached, and described in some even more wooden verse.  The usual markers, by now readily recognizable, are present: the hooked noses, the war bonnet, the headband, the braids.  The wooden poems, not so readily readable from the photos,Continue reading “More Wooden Verse”