Dog and . . . What?

As I was suggesting in my last post, the range of possible go-withs for any specific shaker is as large as the linguistic ingenuity and/or cultural repertoire of its manufacturer.  Consider dogs: We are already familiar with the territory-marking little fellow on the left, happily claiming ownership of the somewhat damaged fellow on the right (noteContinue reading “Dog and . . . What?”

More on the Tyranny of Pairs

I’ve been thinking further about the tyranny of pairs in the world of shaker sets, which I discussed in my last post. It has occurred to me now that it’s the implied connection of the two disparate things in a pair that is, often, the source of the comedy or even the cuteness. A dogContinue reading “More on the Tyranny of Pairs”

The Tyranny of Pairs

Out on the street, you can find, as well as street signs, the occasional fire hydrant:And along with a fire hydrant, you will usually find . . . ?  A fireman, perhaps?  No.  A group of children getting a free drink on a hot summer day?  No.  What a fire hydrant goes with, of course,Continue reading “The Tyranny of Pairs”

Once More for Old Times Sake

The chain of go-withs continues.  First an egg with a goose, then a goose with an old lady, and now, an old lady with . . what? One old lady–no, let us say one mature lady–goes, first of all, with another mature lady:And then, one mature lady clearly goes with a mature gentleman.  Well, ifContinue reading “Once More for Old Times Sake”

Go-Withs

A lot of the sets of shakers in my collection are what the world of salt-and-pepper-set collectors, apparently, call “go-withs”–the ones I like to call binary opposites: the shakers depict two quite different objects that have some logical or linguistic collection to each other, like the common opposites of black and white or good andContinue reading “Go-Withs”

A Different Pair of Binaries

The aboriginal salt-and-pepper sets I’ve been describing in my latest group of posts are all gender-based.  They all consist of of one male and one female–or to be more accurate in the light of their indulgence is stereotypes, one cliché-type brave and one cliché-type squaw–the poem on the female of the pair I looked at in myContinue reading “A Different Pair of Binaries”

More Adult Indigenes

Unlike the sets of salt-and-pepper shakers I’ve been describing in my last five entries, this set does not appear to represent children, and is not particularly cute.  The binary opposites are preserved, as they almost always are in the salt-and-pepper world, and it’s still a male and female couple.   But  the male is aContinue reading “More Adult Indigenes”

Miniature Aboriginality

The racial and ethnic stereotype population of my salt-and-pepper collection consists primarily of shakers depicting the indigenous peoples of North America: I have nine pairs of them.  But of course, these shakers don’t really look anything like any actual former or current members of indigenous nations: what I have on my shelves can be moreContinue reading “Miniature Aboriginality”

What Is It?

This is the most mysterious set of salt and pepper shakers in my collection.  I have no idea at all about what it’s supposed to represent. It appears to be a humanized creature of some sort holding a musical instrument.  But what sort of creature?  While it’s dressed like a human in what might beContinue reading “What Is It?”