Eggs One and Two

The first two of my almost-a-dozen eggs are the most straightforward pair: They are monochromatic white, with no designs or added features.  They are just eggs–or rather, really, not even quite eggs, for the bases that allow them to stand up join seamlessly into their egglike parts, making them look like eggs that come withContinue reading “Eggs One and Two”

Chubby Chef Goes Solo, and Apparently Sings Solo, Too

This not-so-svelte cook is all on his own: With a moustache similar to the gentleman in the set I discussed a couple of posts ago, he seems to be aspring to the Italian-chef stereotype: not just large-tummied and round-cheeked (and cherubically round-nosed), but with a moustache, another perky handlebar moustache.   And from the lookContinue reading “Chubby Chef Goes Solo, and Apparently Sings Solo, Too”

Chubby Chefs Cooking for Campbells

Yet another set of chubby-cheeked chefs: This wide-eyed pair works for  certain soup company, it seems.  They are sitting on their cans.  Their cute chubbiness confirms the chubby cuteness cliché. An odd thing about this set is the variant shape of the containers of condiments against which the two chefs lean.  He leans against aContinue reading “Chubby Chefs Cooking for Campbells”

Chubby Chefs

Speaking of stereotypes (as I have doing in recent posts about salt-and-pepper depictions of Asiatics): did you notice how chubby all those chefs are, in the set I talked about in my last post?  And indeed, not really very much to my surprise, other sets depicting non-Asiatic chefs are equally chubby–like this one: This timeContinue reading “Chubby Chefs”

Chinese Cooking Clones

As I suggested in an earlier post, alongside the exotic aliens, the other major branch of Asiatic stereotypes represented in my salt and pepper shaker collection consists of cooks.  Here’s a pair: The standard stereotypical slanty eyes, so slanty that seem to be creepily without any whites, and this time accompanied by jolly rounded cheeksContinue reading “Chinese Cooking Clones”

More on Veggie People

Copacetically, just after I’ve just been talking in my last post about salt-and-pepper radishes humanized with human eyes, another blog that is also focused on salt and pepper shakers offers a recent newspaper article about “veggie people”–anthropomorphic depictions of humanized vegetables from a century ago, found on cards and other places, including,eventually, salt and pepperContinue reading “More on Veggie People”

Big Radish Is Watching You

If, as I discussed my last post, there’s something odd and unsettling about shalt-and-pepper shakers that look like raw potatoes and that are designed to be put on tables that include cooked food like fries, then what are we to make of a pair like this: Now admittedly, these radishes (I think they are radishes–eitherContinue reading “Big Radish Is Watching You”

Le cru et le cuit

In my last post I talked about how categories get confused when you put salt-and-pepper shakers representing food items on a table in the midst of real food items: categories like real and fake, hard and soft, edible and inedible, etc. Yet another such category, one that the anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss thought was culture-defining, isContinue reading “Le cru et le cuit”

Food, Fictional and Non-Fictional

Thinking as I wrote my last post about how disturbing it was to look at versions of the exact same characters in different poses in two different salt and pepper shaker sets, about how the impression that they could move and take different positions seemed to suggest a life they were leading outside and beyondContinue reading “Food, Fictional and Non-Fictional”